A Wikipedia Week

Wikipedia seems to be attracting even more Pharma interest in recent weeks, particularly as a recent IMS report highlighted how much doctors and patients rely on its content.

It was a pretty immersive week for me last week regarding Wikipedia:

  • A breakfast meeting on the subject
  • Meeting up with some devout Wikipedians over Sunday lunch
  • Finding a little time to make some edits of my own (non pharma related of course)
  • Personally fielding some professional questions about this fascinating community of knowledge

I saw an excellent presentation from, Paul W , a veteran Wikipedian, with 10 years tenure, over 10,000 edits and nearly 400 articles to his name.  He is also a professional PR guy.  You could be forgiven for thinking that these 2 personas would not sit comfortably in the same room, let alone in one human shell.

Paul shared some valuable Wikipedia guidance for PR agencies, that demonstrate PR & Wikipedia are not incompatible entities, as long as the right approach is taken.

These guidelines actually make very useful reading for those in Pharma.  Page 10 is particularly interesting as it outlines the steps required when editing.  There is also a nice summary of Do’s and Don’ts.

These guidelines were created collaboratively on an open Wikipedia page, with input from the community.

Meeting ‘real life’ Wikipedians was an interesting experience.  My discussions with them reinforced the need that anyone with a conflict of interest needs to work with the community to make edits.   I met an administrator who proudly declared he had deleted over 100,000 pages.  While this deletion count seems to be a badge of honour, the motivation behind this, is ensuring Wikipedia, is of a high quality and authored from a neutral point of view.  So any ill advised attempts by Pharma to blunder in and start editing drug or disease pages will inevitably backfire.

Some of my Wikipedia recommendations:

  • Work with the community.  Wikipedia is written from a neutral point of view (one of its five pillars ) The premise is that if you work for a Pharma company, then your opinion about that company, one of its drugs or disease areas, will be biased.  The solution is to work with the community to develop content, identify suitable editors who have contributed good quality articles on similar subjects, suggest articles for creation, use forms to request an edit or use the talk pages.
  • Be transparent and declare conflicts of interest  If you try to contribute under XPharmaCo it won’t work and rightly so.  Corporate or group accounts are not allowed on Wikipedia. It should be, for example, Rebecca, who, on her user page, clearly states she works for XPharmaCo, outlines her conflicts of interest and intent.
  • Be human  You need to speak like a person not a corporation.  Any attempts at corporate speak or a heavy handed approach will simply be met with contempt.  Wikipedia is not a corporation rather a community of dedicated volunteers.
  • Be bold Industry regulations are unclear when it comes to Wikipedia.  Take a clear ethical and considered standpoint.  You will need to have a plan however don’t expect clear regulatory guidance. The UK PMCPA digital guidance spectacularly misses the point, suggesting if a company starts editing Wikipedia it should ensure everything is correct.  I am afraid the community and consensual nature of Wikipedia makes this impossible to guarantee.
  • Have a go If you think Wikipedia is of interest why not try editing it yourself!  You may also want to look for volunteers in your organisation to start making edits.  Clearly these edits need to be outside of any conflicted area and the above bullet points still apply!

I look forward to hearing your opinions or examples where Pharma is currently or is planning to get involved with the Wikipedia community.  And if you have any suggested edits for this blog just let me know…

 

 

Social Media in Pharma – Making it Happen

Last week I presented at the SMI Social Media in Pharma meeting in London.  I got some nice positive feedback that the cases I presented were both practical and useful.

So I have embedded the slideshare deck below complete with speaker call outs.  Feel free to comment on this post or on slideshare.  Happy viewing 🙂

 

 

 

Social Media and Patient Advocacy Groups

 

Recently I presented a workshop on Social Media to a global assortment of patient advocacy groups.

An incredibly enriching experience, 
I walked away feeling I had learned even more than I imparted.

And that for me was a good thing – I loved hearing the groups share their successes and how they search for opportunities where Social Media can enhance the support they can give to patients.

The most significant thing that struck me was their incredible sense of purpose

.

When you consider big companies, the goal is often ‘Just Do Social Media’, the sexy tactic waiting for a strategy.

These guys had an abundance of drive and clear goals, with Social Media a potential vehicle.

They were not interested in a Social Media project for the sake of it – it needed to be aligned with a greater purpose.

The group shared some incredible examples of their work, through committed individuals bound together as a team.

One such example was a change to one countries national policy in terms of reduction on medication copayment
.  Social Media clearly has the power to support such efforts.

It was interesting to hear some of the things that the group wanted from Social Media.

  • Enhancing their offline advocacy and public policy initiatives
  • Establishing more meaningful and enduring connections
 with patients and other important stakeholders
  • Planning the use of Social Media, to be able to respond quickly yet in the most appropriate manner
  • Helping patients to understand as much as possible about their condition

 and its management
  • Generally making sure they are using Social Media in the best possible way
'So what is Social Media?.... Er let me think about that for a while'



‘So what is Social Media?…. Er let me think about that for a while’

 

It was great to hear this feedback directly from those at the front line rather than the usual insipid market research presentations.

The use of Social Media varied widely amongst the groups, so there is clearly a big opportunity to magnify the impact of their campaigns by using Social Media.

Indeed many were new to Social Media, but others were particularly established, caring for vibrant and burgeoning online communities.   These communities offer mutual support and work towards a common purpose.

My biggest personal challenge was minding my language, not so much the expletives, rather speaking at the right pace, to a group of non-native English speakers.

I had to restrain myself from going into a 450 word per minute frenzy on this exciting topic and not peppering my vocabulary with technical and business jargon.  The feedback was I managed this, although it required some serious concentration.

So I learned that objective setting for the patient advocacy groups is not a priority, as they are pretty clear on this already.

Areas they may need further support on are:

  • Understanding the tools available to understand the broader digital landscape in their therapy area
  • Aligning ‘traditional’ advocacy and public policy initiatives with Digital and Social Media
  • How to measure success and understanding what Social Media has contributed.

To be fair these are my assumptions not their requests – with the above recommendations I am probably guilty of self-marketing as I would love to be involved in more of these events!

The Rise of the Emotional Machines

 

Technology is getting emotional, thankfully not in a stroppy or petulant way.

It is not so much about computers expressing emotions, rather becoming more attuned to our own emotional states.

The Q sensor is one device that can monitor emotions and stress levels. An interesting application is in autism  where it has been able to monitor stress levels, that are not discernible from the child’s expressions or body language.

The child can appear to have a very sudden ‘meltdown’ where in reality the sensor shows a gradual build up of stress and frustration, culminating in a sudden emotional crunch point.

Smart cameras that recognise emotions via facial expressions have also been used in autism, in this case predicting other people’s emotions. Autistic children, often unable to discern moods and expressions of others, are given feedback from the device, helping them be more sensitive to other people’s emotions.

 

The Affectiva Q sensor
The Affectiva Q sensor – detecting our emotions

 

These emergent devices have also been used in market research, e.g. assessing the impact of advertising. Rather than gain participant feedback solely via questions and self reported feedback, a much richer and authentic picture can be gathered via biosensors and cameras that track facial expressions

 and emotional response.

These devices have been proven to work effectively in the research stage, yet are still costly.

It won’t be long before they become mainstream and we are all using these devices.

Consider a specific medical example where a doctor is interacting online with promotional or educational content from a pharma company.

The content should already be tailored to that doctor’s specific needs and situation. The beauty of this technology is that it can add another communication layer, tailoring the content to the doctor’s mood and needs at a specific moment in time.

A doctor who normally loves rich data and detail, but who is busy and tired will automatically be provided a shorter summary. A doctor who becomes distracted could be quickly re engaged with a timely question or request to input some information, or being served up some compelling and entertaining content.

Scary? Intrusive? Well who would have thought we would be where we are now, the privacy we have been prepared to trade for various online benefits.

The possibilities are immense for marketing across all sectors.

And it wont be long before our computers have more emotional intelligence than the average medical sales rep. (Although some may say that day arrived long ago)

 

 

Integration is the New Innovation

It seems i missed the season, where multiple predictions are made, on how technology will impact our lives in general and healthcare specifically.  These predictions range from the very optimistic to the very obvious. Now, I’m not knocking this sport – if I had dusted off my crystal ball in time I would certainly have given it a go.

Clearly hibernating and late out of the starting blocks I thought I would indulge myself with only 1 pharma 2013 prediction. In fact prediction is a little grandiose, it is more of an observation,

This year will be where ‘Pharma’ spends it’s energies integrating existing tactics rather than experimenting with new ones.

Several high profile clients I have worked with in 2012 are doing very little revolutionary in terms of individual tactics. The innovative bit, is actually joining the right old & new tactics together in a way that meets customer & business needs, in an efficient and measurable way.

Admittedly this may sound insipid and uninspiring, clearly less fun compared to say… developing a novel thought recognition health social media platform that is able to moderate comments and record Adverse Events before they are even written. etc. etc.

However, effective integration is the key to unlocking the business value from digital & social media and many pharma companies are starting to realise this.

Similar to me with this post, some of the companies I work with were late out of the starting blocks when it came to digital marketing. They let the pioneers take the arrows – learn from the early mistakes & successes and are now in a position to leapfrog their digital exploring rivals.

Some examples of this thinking are:-

  • Ensuring there are defined and accessible metrics for each and every tactic, from web portals to medical apps.  Based on customer behaviour and feedback the tactic can then be quickly optimised, scrapped or replaced.
  • Customer channel preferences should be captured, allowing them to select the channel and frequency of communication.
  • The entire customer journey needs to be mapped and relevant, engaging content served up at each stage. An easy truism to trot out, yet a significant challenge to make a reality.  An example, is if a customer completes an online learning module, their responses should be used to tailor future modules and inform the wider relationship with the company.
  • Strong behavioural calls to action need to be set up and monitored, i.e. number of Doctors reviewing a product administration video or number of patients downloading a symptom checking app or simple checklist, that recommends they see a doctor if required.
  • And of course ensuring a tighter integration with the sales force, if they are indeed a relevant part of the mix.

So then, is 2013 set to be a boring year for pharma?

Well I actually can’t see many (business!) things being more exciting than being able to deliver mutual customer & business value in a measurable way.

There will and should still be experimentation of course, primarily at a strategic level, where pharma examines suitable future business models and what services will be most relevant to consumers in the emerging landscape.

I’d be interested in hearing if this is reality, is the experimentation phase being replaced by one of more focussed integrated execution?  Or is my experience at odds with an ongoing digital wild west of pharma? Feel free to add your thoughts…